Tuesday, November 8, 2011

A Simple, Personal Way to Thank Veterans

Today's guest post was written by Dave McLaughlin

In the spirit of eMail Our Military, Vthankyou is an effort to give Americans a simple way to support veterans and soldiers. Anyone with a webcam and an internet connection can post a short video message of gratitude and good will for veterans, up to sixty seconds long, by going to vsnap.com.

Video messages capture emotion and personality in a way that text usually doesn’t. Here are some examples that give a sense of how these messages are so simple, but so moving. They also illustrate the variety of voices and messages that people are posting.

Please join this campaign and add your own video message to thank our veterans. Just go to Vsnap.com. If you have a Twitter account, you can sign in with those credentials. If not, you can enter your email and make up a password. The service is free, and Vthankyou has lined up corporate donors who will make a $5 donation to The Wounded Warrior Project for each video message that gets posted.

You can even attach other documents to the video message. You might want to add a photo of a family member who has served, or a link to a song that reminds you of someone now deployed. Anything you like.

When you share your message, please send it to vthankyou@vsnap.com, and please cc a few friends that you think will want to add their voices to this campaign. We believe very strongly that the vast majority of Americans share a deep respect and gratitude for the service and sacrifice of veterans and their families, and Vthankyou is our attempt at giving those folks a simple way to share that gratitude with veterans and with the world.

If you have any questions, please find us on Twitter @Vthankyou or @Vsnap. Thanks for saying Vthankyou!

Here is my ThankYou Message to veterans.

Record yours here. Takes 2 minutes. Each one sends $5 to charity!

eMail Our Military - Care Packages and Gifts

Tweet us at: @MailOurMilitary and follow our blog feed at: @eMOMs

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3 comments:

Mike said...

Thanks for sharing this wonderful post. really like this post.

Lanny Forrester

Shawn said...

Thanks for sharing a great way to show support. I am going to send this to my friends and share with them since I do not have a webcam.

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